Henry Glick

Henry Glick
  • Professor of Medicine; Professor of Health Care Management

Contact Information

Research

  • Monica Ferguson, Judith Long, Jingsan Zhu, Dylan Small, Brittany Lawson, Henry Glick, Marilyn Schapira (2015), Low Health Literacy Predicts Misperceptions of Diabetes Control in Patients With Persistently Elevated A1C, The Diabetes Educator, 41 (3), pp. 309-319.

  • Kevin Volpp, AB Troxel, Mark V. Pauly, Henry Glick, Andrea Puig, David A. Asch, R Galvin, J Zhu, F Wan, J DeGuzman, E Corbett, J Weiner, J Audrain-McGovern (2009), A Randomized Controlled Trial of Financial Incentives for Smoking Cessation, The New England Journal of Medicine, 360:699-709.

    Abstract: Smoking remains the leading preventable cause of premature death in the United States, accounting for approximately 438,000 deaths each year.1 Seventy percent of smokers report that they want to quit,2 but annually only 2 to 3% of smokers succeed. 3,4 Although smoking-cessation programs and pharmacologic therapies have been associated with higher rates of cessation, rates of participation in such programs and use of such therapies are low.5,6 Work sites offer a promising venue for encouraging smoking cessation because employers are likely to bear many of the excess health care costs and productivity losses that are due to missed work among smokers. In addition, existing channels of communication can be used to reach smokers and reinforce healthful behavior choices. Previous studies have shown that providing smokers with financial incentives to stop smoking increases enrollment in smoking-cessation programs and short-term cessation rates,7-10 but the studies have not shown significant increases in long-term cessation rates. Similarly, studies of financial-incentive programs in work settings have not shown significant differences in long-term cessation rates,11 though the studies generally were limited by small sample sizes and weak financial incentives. In this randomized, controlled trial involving employees at a large, multinational company based in the United States, we tested the effectiveness of a financial incentive of up to $750 in improving long-term rates of smoking cessation.

Teaching

Current Courses

  • EPID550 - Clin Econ & Clin Dec Mkg

    This course focuses on the application of decision analysis and economic analysis to clinical and policy research. The course begins with material about the selection, use, and analysis of diagnostic tests using two by two tables, likelihood ratios, and ROC curves. The course continues with the introduction of more general tools for decision analysis, including decision trees and other mathematical models. Special emphasis is placed on the assessment and use of utilities in these models. A major focus of the course is the application of economic principles to the evaluation of health outcomes. During seminars, students will carry out practical exercises that include problem solving, critically analyzing published articles, and learning to use computer software that facilitates decision and economic analyses.

    EPID550401

  • HPR 550 - Clin Econ & Clin Dec Mkg

    This course focuses on the application of decision analysis and economic analysis of diagnostic tests using two by two tables, likelihood ratios, and ROC curves. The course continues with the introduction of more general tools for decision analysis, including decision trees and other mathematical models. A major focus of the course is the application of economic principles to the evaluation of health outcomes. During seminars, students will carry out practictical exercises that include problem solving, critically analyzing published articles, and learning to use computer software that facilitates decision and economic analyses.

    HPR 550401

Past Courses

  • EPID550 - CLIN ECON & CLIN DEC MKG

    This course focuses on the application of decision analysis and economic analysis to clinical and policy research. The course begins with material about the selection, use, and analysis of diagnostic tests using two by two tables, likelihood ratios, and ROC curves. The course continues with the introduction of more general tools for decision analysis, including decision trees and other mathematical models. Special emphasis is placed on the assessment and use of utilities in these models. A major focus of the course is the application of economic principles to the evaluation of health outcomes. During seminars, students will carry out practical exercises that include problem solving, critically analyzing published articles, and learning to use computer software that facilitates decision and economic analyses.

  • EPID610 - TUTORIAL IN EPI RESEARCH

    This is a tutorial given by each student's advisor. Advisor and student meet weekly. Topics include: discussion and review of epidemiologic concepts and principles, guided readings in the epidemiology of a specific health area, and the development of the research protocol.

  • EPID900 - MASTER'S THESIS

    These are a series of tutorial sessions conducted by the student's advisor, which are to support the student's efforts in developing a research protocol, designing a designing a research project, and completing the study.

  • HCMG901 - SEM:HLTH CARE COST BEN

    This course will cover empirical methods used in economics research with an emphasis on applications in health care and public economics. The methods covered include linear regression, matching, panel data models, instumental variables, regression discontinuity, bunching, qualitative and limited dependent variable models, count data, quantile regressions, and duration models. the discussion will be a mix of theory and application, with emphasis on the latter. The readings consist of a blend of classic and recent methodological and empirical papers in economics. Course requirements include several problem sets, paper presentations, an econometric analysis project and a final exam. The course is open to doctoral students from departments other than Health Care Management with permission from the instructor.

  • HPR 550 - CLIN ECON & CLIN DEC MKG

    This course focuses on the application of decision analysis and economic analysis of diagnostic tests using two by two tables, likelihood ratios, and ROC curves. The course continues with the introduction of more general tools for decision analysis, including decision trees and other mathematical models. A major focus of the course is the application of economic principles to the evaluation of health outcomes. During seminars, students will carry out practictical exercises that include problem solving, critically analyzing published articles, and learning to use computer software that facilitates decision and economic analyses.

Activity

Latest Research

Monica Ferguson, Judith Long, Jingsan Zhu, Dylan Small, Brittany Lawson, Henry Glick, Marilyn Schapira (2015), Low Health Literacy Predicts Misperceptions of Diabetes Control in Patients With Persistently Elevated A1C, The Diabetes Educator, 41 (3), pp. 309-319.
All Research